Thursday, November 18, 2004

Euthanasia vs Abortion

What about the other end of the bathtub curve? Although euthanasia is essentially banned and considered legally murder, if my grandmother,97, dies in hospital should the police spend as many resources investigating the death as for a 20 year old? Should mercy-kills, euthanasia, be classed as a separate crime, even if the punishment remains unchanged? Should doctors be both the suspects and the ones in charge of the evidence? If you mourn less for somebody because they are at a risky end of the bathtub curve, would it matter as much what caused it? If Kylie felt under stress due to an argument and she ended up miscarrying, would she want the police to investigate it as they would a death of a baby? Would all conceptions have to be registered?

2 comments:

Dr. Clam said...

Soon we will all be under surveillance by everyone else all the time, so automatic registration of conceptions will become possible! I think the bathtub curve is a very handy tool for deciding how we should deal with human mortality- the more risky a stage of life, the less we should make a big deal of death during this stage...

Marco said...

There is a bit of a contradiction there, surely. Are you saying that although we should concern ourselves less with deaths at the risky ends of the bathtub, that we should strongly prohibit "playing God" at those same ends if it involves killing, but encourage as many resources as we can "playing God" in saving lives, both with extremely premature babies and the very elderly, who would otherwise die?

The contradiction there is mixing "concern ourselves less" with "strongly prohibit" and "many resources" when talking about essentially the same person.